Canon R6 — Very Impressive

My Canon R6 arrive last week and today was the first time I had a chance to take it out for a test shoot.

I am impressed!!

My outing today was mainly to test the auto focus on the R6 compared with the more expensive R5. Conclusion: I can’t see any difference.

The Canon R6 reminds me of my Canon 5D Mark IV and I was not disappointed with the R6.

My first bird this morning was a ring-billed gull. It was just standing on the beach so not much of a challenge. Canon R6, 100-500mm lens with a 1.4x extender. Auto focus 1, Servo, one focus point.
Sanderling running on the beach. Same setting as above but using wide area auto focus. The camera stayed in focus. My job was to keep the camera on the bird.
Sanderling with the same settings as above. Remember, these birds seem to never stand still.
Royal tern in flight. Wide area auto focus. There were 10 or 12 shots in this series as the bird flew by. All were in focus.
Brown pelican going into a plunge dive. With the R6 on rapid release, I captured 10 or more shots as the pelicans did their dive. Each was in focus..

Notice that I compared the Canon R6 to the Canon 5D Mark IV when comparing auto focus capabilities. My Canon 5D Mark IV always beat my 7D Mark II in the auto focus arena. The 7D Mark II would miss a shot here and there in a series. The 5D Mark IV got all the shots in a series in focus. That’s the same thing I saw in my test today with the Canon R6. It held auto focus throughout the series without missing a single shot!

Not once today did I notice the Canon R6 hunting for the subject. I pointed the camera at the bird, the camera locked on the focus, and I clicked the shutter button. We were working as a team — the camera and me.

I’ll post a more thorough comparison of the Canon R5 and Canon R6 in the next few days. This is just the beginning.

Sequence of brown pelican diving.

Canon R5 — Autofocus Settings — Face Tracking with Eye Detect

Canon R5 auto focus method is on face tracking and Eye Detection enabled
Canon R5 auto focus method is on Face Tracking for animals.
Wild turkey in a grassy field in the Texas Hill Country. With my Canon 1DX, I would have used one focus point and moved it to the turkey’s face. With the Canon R5, I simply switch to Animal Face and Eye Detection and the camera locks on to the turkey’s eye.
This green tree frog was deep in the reeds. I switched to Animal Face and Eye Detect and the camera locked on immediately.
Ruby-crowned kinglet is a hyper-active little bird. It was deep in the brush, so I moved to Animal Face and Eye Detection then the Canon R5 found the bird.
Lesser scaup with the eye detection on the male on the right.
This is what we see through the viewfinder as the focus method is changed.