Transform Tool on Travel Photos

I’m working through the thousands of photos I took in Spain during my recent photo tour to Andalusia and Barcelona.

Buildings were our most common subject.  Often it was hard to get right in front of the building.  Many times we were shooting straight up when we really needed to be higher  like on the second floor of the building across the street.

The Transform tool in Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom is really coming in handy.

Take a look at this before and after:

Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 12.05.25 PM
Here’s the original photo Iglesia del Salvador.  It’s a lovely church in the Seville’s Santa Cruz neighborhood near the hotel where we stayed.  I included a lot of sky and a lot the building because I knew I’d use the Transform tool in processing.  

The Transform tool is activated in the photo above and ready to go.

Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 12.04.51 PM
Here’s the finished photo.  I put a vertical Transform guide on the left and right white column.  Then I put a horizontal Transform guide on the two main horizontal lines.  I finished with a bit of vertical tweaking with the slider to bring the building a bit more upright.

Transform tool to the rescue.

Have you used the Transform tool?  Does it work well for you?

Use The Shadow Slider

When traveling, we don’t always get to choose when we can be at a location.  Harsh light can get in the way of a good photo.  That’s why I suggest you make friends with the Shadow slider in Adobe Camera Raw, Lightroom, or Elements.

Spain; Seville; Plaza de Espana
Well exposed image with no highlights blown out.  The area on the right is in deep shadows, though.
Spain; Seville; Plaza de Espana
Same image with basic processing in Adobe Camera Raw. The shadows on the right have been opened thanks to the Shadow slider in Adobe Camera Raw.  Same slider is in Lightroom and Elements.

Have you used the Shadow slider?  Does it work?

Vacation Photography — Remove All Those Tourists — Well, maybe

Some say that HDR, or high-dynamic range, is a great way to remove tourists from our photos taken in busy vacation locations.  Well, maybe sometimes.

First some explanations.  HDR is high-dynamic range photography.  Our eye sees 22-stops of light but the camera can capture about 5-stops.  HDR images allow us to photograph details in the shadows while still maintaining details in the highlights.

To create a HDR photo, we take 2 or more photos from the same location and vary the exposure.  The examples below have been created from seven photos.  The exposures range from balanced light meter to -3-stops all the way to +3-stops.

HDR software has an option to deghost or remove people.  Deghosting removes people from the final photo if those people didn’t appear in the same spot in all the photos.  There’s usually a scale so we can vary the intensity of deghosting.  I’ve set the deghosting to maximum on each image.

You see that people are still in my photo of the busy street in San Gimignano, Italy.  The only person who stood still through all seven photos was the man in the gray windbreaker on the left.  Everyone else moved.  The lady in the orange coat walked straight at the camera through all seven photos.  The man with the umbrella walked across the scene from right to left.

In conclusion, the crowded street is still crowded with people.  The different software, though, handled processing in a variety of ways.

 

San Gimignano Italy KAC5699_HDR_aurora
This is an HDR image created with Macphun’s Aurora HDR software.
San Gimignano Italy KAC5699_HDR_nik
This is an HDR image created from the same files but processed with Nik’s  HDR Efex software.  Notice that there’s a half person on the left and two half people on the right.  We call these “ghosts.”  All of the HDR software offer a deghosting option.
San Gimignano Italy KAC5699-HDR_PS
Same files processed in Photoshop’s Adobe Camera Raw HDR feature.  Notice there is no ghosting.  The man with the umbrella in the center of the photo doesn’t appear in that location in any of the other examples.

Here are the seven photos used to build these HDR photos.

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