“Use the White Balance Tool in Adobe”

We were photographing at twilight on the my recent photo tour to Seville, Spain.  The natural light was mixing with the man-made light illuminating the walls of the Mezquita.

A member of our group said that she hated the color she was getting on her photos.  In unison, five of use said, “Use the white balance tool in Lightroom or Photoshop later on.”  I was one of those voices.  Take a look.

Mezquita Cathedral de Cordoba KAC0052as shot
Wall of the Mezquita in Seville, Spain photographed using AWB or Auto White Balance on the camera.  Yes, the color doesn’t look great but some people like this color cast.
Mezquita Cathedral de Cordoba KAC0052
This the same image processed in Adobe Camera Raw.  I used the White Balance Tool and touched it to the bright area above the second arch.  Viola!  Looks like what I saw with my eye.

The White Balance Tool in Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom  is a powerful tool.  I suggest leaving the cameras set to Auto White Balance (AWB) and the make any corrections later on in processing.

I find Auto White Balance in the camera to be right most of the time.  In those instances where it’s off, then a simple touch of the  White Balance Tool puts things back in order.

Macphun Tonality

Macphun Tonality is turning out to be a great way to create black-and-white and toned images.

Take a look at the processing I did on my image of a shrine to a holy man in Morocco.

Holy Shrine, burial grounds, shrine, Morocco; Skoura
Here’s the image with basic processing with Adobe Camera Raw.
Holy Shrine, burial grounds, shrine, Morocco; Skoura
I opened the above image in Macphun Tonality.  Then I used the preset “300 bleached.”  No other processing.

 

Holy Shrine, burial grounds, shrine, Morocco; Skoura
My first image processed in Machphun Tonality with the “Bleached Drama” preset.
Holy Shrine, burial grounds, shrine, Morocco; Skoura
The first image processed with Macphun Tonality “Baby Blues” preset.  Nothing hard.  Just push the button and enjoy the image.
Holy Shrine, burial grounds, shrine, Morocco; Skoura
The original image opened in Macphun Tonality.  Then processed in “Monochrome Dreams.”

Tonality is in Macphun’s Creative Kit.  I hope you’ll give it Tonality a try.

Macphun Intensify versus NIK

Lightning Storm KAC6786_1
Here’s the image processed with Adobe Camera Raw.
Lightning Storm KAC6786
Same image as above then processed with Macphun Intensify.  The clouds really pop with drama.
Lightning Storm KAC6786nik
I stared with the first image and then did a little post processing with Google’s NIK Color Efex Detail Extractor.  

This comparison illustrates that Macphun Intensify can give us the great results we loves with Google’s NIK Color Efex Detail Extractor.

Macphun Intensify

It’s interesting to compare images processed in Adobe Camera Raw then enhanced with Nik Color Efex Pro 4 versus Macphun Intensify.  I’ve done pretty simple processing on each of the photos you see below.  Each was processed in a minute or so — if that much.

Atlantic Ocean, crashing waves, Essaouira; Morocco
This image was processed in Adobe Camera Raw.  Clarify — 40, Vibrance — 20, Saturation — 20, Exposure — +1.05, Shadow — +52.  
Atlantic Ocean KAC5129Nik
The same image as above.  Opened in Photoshop and then opened in Nik’s Color Efex Pro 4.  A bit of tweaking with the detail extractor  slider.
Atlantic Ocean, crashing waves, Essaouira; Morocco
Same basic processing as photo #1 in Adobe Camera Raw.  Then opened in Photoshop and then opened in Macphun Intensify.  I used a bit of Architectural Details and then some Balanced Tones.  

Once again, simple processing on each image.  Nothing complicated.  No dodging, burning, layers, etc.  Just some basic processing.

I was impressed with Nik but I’m really impressed with Macphun.

Use Promo code Adams to get a discount when buying Macphun Luminar or Aurora HDR.